Longleaf Avoided Emissions

The defeat of the proposed coal plant, Longleaf Energy Station, prevented the emission of millions of tons of toxic air pollutants into the air in Georgia. The table below provides the maximum allowable pollution that this proposed dirty coal plant would have been allowed to put into the air, had the plant ever been built.

 

Pollutant Annual Emissions Lifetime Emissions (50 years)
Carbon Dioxide (CO2)  9.7 million tons 485 million tons
Nitrogen Oxide  2,689 tons 134,450 tons
Sulfur Dioxide  5,647 tons 282,350 tons
Particulate Matter (PM) 10  1,855 tons 92,750 tons
PM 2.5  1361tons 68,050 tons
Mercury  88 pounds 4,400 pounds
Volatile organic compounds  194 tons 9,700 tons
Carbon monoxide  5,378 tons 268,900 tons
Lead 1,936 pounds 96,800 pounds

Carbon Dioxide (CO2): contributes to climate change.  Longleaf's emissions would have been the equivalent of placing 1.5 million cars driving 12,000 miles annually for 50 year.

Nitrogen Oxide (NOx): leads to formation of ozone (smog) which inflames the lungs, burning through lung tissue making people more susceptible to respiratory illness

Sulfur Dioxide (SO2): causes acid rain that damages forests, lakes, and buildings, and forms small airborne particles that can penetrate deep into lungs

Particulate Matter:  small airborne particles, which can cause chronic bronchitis, aggravated asthma, and premature death, as well as haze obstructing visibility

Mercury:  a powerful neurotoxin that interferes with the brain and nervous system and can impair development in children

VOCs: precursor to smog which inflames the lungs, burning through lung tissue making people more susceptible to respiratory illness

Carbon Monoxide (CO):  causes headaches and place additional stress on people with heart disease

Carbon Dioxide: primary contributor to climate change

Lead: can adversely affect the nervous system, kidney function, immune system, reproductive and developmental systems and the cardiovascular system